Monday, December 20, 2010

AMBROSE PINTO

AN OPEN LETTER TO FATHER AMBROSE PINTO

Dear Father Ambrose Pinto,

It is intriguing that you have been selected by the BJP government in Karnataka as a recipient of this year’s Rajyotsava Award. Hearty congratulations.
But, touch your heart and give me an honest to God answer: Are you worthy of this honour? Can you deny the fact that every time you open your mouth and wield your pen it is only to spew venom on the Hindu community whom you have always termed as Bhraminical? RSS, VHP. Bajarangi Dal and BJP bashing has been your second nature? In addition, you have a soft-corner for anti-national elements, separatists and the Naxalites and their ideologies through your writings and speeches. I am telling you these facts because I have been critically following your writings and activities in the past two decades or more as a freelance journalist.

Needless to add, self-styled Dalit and minority leaders like you have emerged bereft of principles. Our national life has been polluted by the venality of the discredited men like you. You have therefore no moral right to criticize the ‘saffron brigade’.

My only appeal to you, in the name of the Rebel of Nazareth (Jesus of Nazareth), is to refuse to accept the award conferred on you by the ‘Hindu extremist’ BJP government – if you have an iota of that precious quality called self-respect left in you. I pity the ignorance of those who recommended your name for the coveted award.

God bless
P.N.BENJAMIN
Bangalore

2 comments:

Prithvi Urs said...

Father Ambrose Pinto taught me at St Joseph's College and was very critical on facebook about Modi -2012, the BJP etc etc and so called Hindu right wing politics. However the moment this article given below was posted, he has become silent. I recommend you read the same and do not go around preaching when your fellow Christians have blood on their hands. You have made Francis Zavier a "Saint".
The Goa Inquisition was the office of the Portuguese Inquisition acting in Portuguese India, and in the rest of the Portuguese Empire in Asia. It was established in 1560, briefly suppressed from 1774–1778, and finally abolished in 1812.[1] Based on the records that survive, H. P. Salomon and I. S. D. Sassoon state that between the Inquisition's beginning in 1561 and its temporary abolition in 1774, some 16,202 persons were brought to trial by the Inquisition. Of this number, it is known that 57 were sentenced to death and executed; another 64 were burned in effigy. Others were subjected to lesser punishments or penance, but the fate of many of those tried by the Inquisition is unknown.[2]
The Inquisition was established to punish apostate New Christians—Jews and Muslims who converted to Catholicism, as well as their descendants—who were now suspected of practising their ancestral religion in secret.[2]
In Goa, the Inquisition also turned its attention to Indian converts from Hinduism or Islam who were thought to have returned to their original ways. In addition, the Inquisition prosecuted non-converts who broke prohibitions against the observance of Hindu or Muslim rites or interfered with Portuguese attempts to convert non-Christians to Catholicism.[2]

Prithvi Urs said...

Father Ambrose Pinto taught me at St Joseph's College and was very critical on facebook about Modi -2012, the BJP etc etc and so called Hindu right wing politics. However the moment this article given below was posted, he has become silent. I recommend you read the same and do not go around preaching when your fellow Christians have blood on their hands. You have made Francis Zavier a "Saint".
The Goa Inquisition was the office of the Portuguese Inquisition acting in Portuguese India, and in the rest of the Portuguese Empire in Asia. It was established in 1560, briefly suppressed from 1774–1778, and finally abolished in 1812.[1] Based on the records that survive, H. P. Salomon and I. S. D. Sassoon state that between the Inquisition's beginning in 1561 and its temporary abolition in 1774, some 16,202 persons were brought to trial by the Inquisition. Of this number, it is known that 57 were sentenced to death and executed; another 64 were burned in effigy. Others were subjected to lesser punishments or penance, but the fate of many of those tried by the Inquisition is unknown.[2]
The Inquisition was established to punish apostate New Christians—Jews and Muslims who converted to Catholicism, as well as their descendants—who were now suspected of practising their ancestral religion in secret.[2]
In Goa, the Inquisition also turned its attention to Indian converts from Hinduism or Islam who were thought to have returned to their original ways. In addition, the Inquisition prosecuted non-converts who broke prohibitions against the observance of Hindu or Muslim rites or interfered with Portuguese attempts to convert non-Christians to Catholicism.[2]